Music

Five times Madness have proved they’re a British institution

The London ska legends have big things planned for their tour schedule this summer.

Ahead of their arena dates in December, Madness will headline Edinburgh Corn Exchange, Cyfarthfa Castle in Merthyr Tydfil and Clapham Common this August.

In preparation, we’re looking back at some of Madness’ ultimate career highs – namely five times Suggs and co have proved they’re a British institution in their own right. Proof this way…

1. House of Fun may be the band’s only number #1 single but What. A. Song. The track was also voted as the nation’s eighth favourite 1980s number one in a 2015 poll for ITV. Backed.

2. The ska revival. Despite the influential likes of Rolling Stone shaking their heads at the ’70s ska revival, hits likes One Step Beyond (which kept Madness in the UK charts for 78 weeks), My Girl and Baggy Trousers ensured this lot were at the forefront of the action.

3. Madstock! The band’s 1992 reunion saw them take over the iconic grounds of London’s Finsbury Park for two days in August of that year, with a bill including Flowered Up, Gallon Drunk, Ian Dury and The Blockheads and Morrissey. That said, Morrissey’s Union Jack flag stunt ended up causing more controversy and headlines than Madness’ reunion itself.

4. Casually playing on top of Buckingham Palace was something Madness managed to make their own in 2012, when they performed Our House and It Must Be Love at the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee concert. Did we mention they were on the ROOF of the palace?

5. Bringing ska to the closing ceremony. Madness were the first band to perform at the 2012 London Olympic Games – departed bass player Mark Bedford even rejoined the band for both this performance and the Jubilee earlier that year.

Madness Olympic Games

Basically, anything Madness touch turns to gold. If gold was made purely of massive pop hooks and unforgettable ska-punk choruses.

Catch Madness live in the UK this August – book tickets now via Ticketmaster.co.uk.

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